Tuesday, September 18, 2018

DMC: "Branch Line" by Tabatha Yeatts





Branch Line

How do we make something new?

How do we take that hand, still as a rock, pick up
those heavy, heavy fingers and push ourselves,
force our way through all that protective bone,
move past the little shocks of neurons trying to
ride their carts down their usual tracks?

So tempting to pull our hands back, let those
familiar travellers roll unimpeded along the line,
arriving on schedule. But today, here you are,
rushing before those clattery wheels,
laying fresh tracks the second before they dart past,
keeping them from falling into oblivion below.

They spin, you go on, pounding down one
after another, dropping them out
of your fingertips, you frenzied engineer,
and, lo, a new destination.


© 2018 Tabatha Yeatts. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Monday, September 17, 2018

DMC: "What is a Body Worth?" by Margaret Simon




What is a Body Worth?

Holocaust Museum: millions die
Faceless sculptures
Piles of gray shoes
A wall of hair
What is a body worth?

Facebook reports: two suicides
Someone’s daughter
Someone’s friend
Someone we lost for losing
What is a body worth?

On all the news: John McCain
An American hero,
Warrior, senator,
One life forged for many.
What is a body worth?

National Book Festival: one father
reads my poem
to his infant son.
My heart beats stronger.
My body stands taller.
Such a small thing can
make a life worthy. 


© 2018 Margaret Simon. All rights reserved.

For more about Margaret's experience at the National Book Festival, visit this blog post.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Friday, September 14, 2018

Carrie Clickard: Doing the Submission Shuffle (Part Two)




Is your writing cave a hot mess like mine is?

Well, you're in luck. Carrie Clickard is back today with the second half of her extensive look at the submission process—she promises to help us make a dent in those piles of original poetry. What's more, there's no denying that Carrie's posts are always fun!

If you missed last week's post—Doing the Submission Shuffle (Part One)—take a minute to catch up, but don't dawdle. There's heaps of great information to explore this week, too!

Take it away, Carrie—


Doing the Submission Shuffle (Part Two)

So you’re back for more, are you? Glad I’m not all alone in here. Then again considering how I look attempting the shuffle, maybe I should be. (grin)



Well, onward and upward as I always say. Last week in part one we covered some excellent printed resources and three of the big online submission aggregators that you can use to discover good poetry markets.  Today we’ll wander farther afield and find more treasure troves online.


Bloggers and forums

There are some remarkably kind-hearted bloggers who post writing opportunity lists monthly, do interviews with editors and agents, keep running track of contests, etc—all out of the goodness of their heart (plus the hope of more blog traffic and followers, naturally).



Publishing ... and Other Forms of Insanity posts an excellent list of calls for submissions at the start of every month. (General writing: not exclusively poetry or any single genre.) They also have sections for Agents seeking Clients and Editors accepting Manuscripts.

In the children’s corner, Literary Rambles is a well-established, superb source for deep digging and narrowing your list for submissions to agents and book publishing editors. Look elsewhere for specific magazine or anthology opportunities.

Author and puzzle maker Ev Christensen’s Writing for Children’s Magazines is a great resource for writing submission opportunities, market changes and generally excellent writing advice. She’s got great depth of experience and shares valuable material.

If you write speculative poetry (SF, Fantasy or Horror) try Ralan, who covers everything from magazines to anthologies to book publishers.

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (SFPA) has a market listing page (not always freshly maintained) and a Facebook page you can follow without being a member.

On the darker side, Dark Markets or the Horror Tree both have market opportunity listings for anthologies and book publishers seeking poetry submissions.



Feeling overwhelmed already? Don’t panic. Whittling down which sites work for you will probably be quick work after your first visit. Then you can strike a few off the list and get on with other relaxing jobs, like writing your query letters. (Blergh)


Social media

Facebook has several “open call” or submission opportunity groups you can follow based on your preferred genre or poetry in general. A few of my faves are Poetry Submission Portal, Open Call: Science Fiction, Fantasy & Pulp Markets, and Open Call: Horror Markets. Because Facebook is Facebook, they don’t link properly here, but it’s worth your while searching for “open calls.” You’re bound to find at least one useful group to join/follow.

Don’t forget you can add your favorite submission websites and blogs on to your twitter feed too, as nearly all of them blast out to the Twitterverse. Not to mention following any key editors or agents you have on your “wanted list." Not all of them post about their publishing work, but many do.

Those of you working on full poetry collections or chapbooks should definitely catch the #MSWL (Manuscript Wish List) where agents and editors post their own “most wanteds.” The majority of posts describe MG/YA novels, but there are occasional mentions of verse novels, plus plenty of food for inspiration.

But a word of caution here (memo to me, memo to me). We all know how distracting social media can be. One wrong click and we lose an hour or more to amusing, nonproductive time-sucks. Not to mention the risk of stumbling over those emotional FOMO landmines where OTHER POETS are celebrating acceptances when our own email has been filled with reasons to:


OR



Sigh.  Sure it only takes a few keystrokes to say a sincere congratz and move on. That is if you avoid my typical 15-45 minutes of wallowing in despair and the search for chocolate. 



The joys of community poetry sharing

If you’re especially lucky (or smart) you already belong to a poetry community like Michelle’s where you’ll find one of the best sources of writing opportunities—other poets just like you.  We’re all out there in the publishing world every day, seeking out and stumbling over opportunities: good established markets, interesting ezine startups, or that perfect once in a lifetime gem. Unless you spend all day everyday searching obscure blogs you’re sure to miss some of those great chances. That’s where poet to poet information can make all the difference.

So here is an assortment of (mostly children's) poetry markets we’ve run into:

Highlights, High Five & Hello
http://highlights.submittable.com/submit

Cricket Media literary mags plus Muse and Ask
http://cricketmag.submittable.com/submit

Cricket nonfiction – Click, Cobblestone, Dig, Faces
http://cricketmedia.com/submission-guidelines

US kids – Jack & Jill, Humpty Dumpty
http://www.uskidsmags.com/writers-guidelines

Wee Tales
http://www.goldenfleecepress.com/submissions.html

Fun For Kidz – limited poetry opportunities
http://funforkidzmagazines.com/writers

Hunger Mountain
http://hungermtn.org/submit/

Kids Imagination Train
http://www.kidsimaginationtrain.com/p/blog-page.html

Guardian Angel Kids
http://www.guardian-angel-kids.com/submissions.html

Bumples
http://www.bumples.com/WritersGuidelines.aspx?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

The School Magazine of Australia
http://theschoolmagazine.com.au/contributors/writers

Enchanted Conversation
http://www.fairytalemagazine.com/p/submissions-guidelines.html

Goblin Fruit
http://www.goblinfruit.net/2014/fall/guidelines/

The Caterpillar
http://www.thecaterpillarmagazine.com/a1-page.asp?ID=4150&page=9

The Moth
http://www.themothmagazine.com/a1-page.asp?ID=1972&page=35

Frostfire Worlds
http://www.albanlakepublishing.com/frostfire

Tin House
http://tinhouseonline.submittable.com/submit

Pedestal Magazine
http://www.thepedestalmagazine.com/submissions

Overland
http://overland.org.au/submit

The Three Penny Review
http://www.threepennyreview.com/submissions.html

Clubhouse Jr. (Christian)
http://www.clubhousejr.com/submission-guidelines.aspx

SHINE brightly (Christian)
http://gemsgc.org/shine-brightly-writers-guideline

Sparkle (Christian)
http://gemsgc.org/writers-guideline-sparkle-magazine


This is by no means an exhaustive list, just some of the well-knowns, plus a few personal favorites. If we’ve missed your favorite or you have a new market to share, please chime in. Jump into the comments and tell us about it.


An annoying note about record-keeping

The possibility of being published can be so exciting at first that you may find yourself getting a little carried away:



And then what happens? You find out you’ve simultaneously subbed to markets that don’t accept simultaneous subs. And you’ll have to eat crow with an editor if one of the two gets accepted and you have to withdraw from the other. Editors remember that stuff, don’t think they don’t—especially if they really liked the piece you just took away.



So how do we avoid the awkward submission stumble? Yes, you guessed it—boring file keeping. Whether you do it on paper or digitally, you need to track what you sent where and their responses. The only thing more embarrassing than having a poem rejected once is having it rejected twice BY THE SAME EDITOR WHO RECOGNIZES IT.



So you NEED a system. Any system that works. If you like tactile, give each poem a 3x5 card and put them in an “at home” or an “out seeking work” pile. Each time you sub a poem log the editor and publication name. Date it and move it to the out pile. When the response comes in, log yes or no and the date and move on. You can do the same with a file folder. Going larger lets you incorporate printed responses as well as contracts, and even tear sheets from the printed publications. Basic systems have the advantage of being low-tech, fast to set up, inexpensive, and easy to maintain (if your house is cat and toddler free). Plus it looks like you’re accomplishing something even when you’re not. (wink)



But the longer you sub and the more pieces you have to sub, the more you’ll need a digitally searchable system you don’t have to dig through. There are probably a hundred ways to digitally track your subs. You can use one of the pre-designed online sites, like Duotrope, The Submission Grinder, or Submittable. You can buy submission tracking software. Freelance Writing Jobs and the SFWA both have useful articles comparing the software out there. Any digital software will give you the advantage of searching your submissions without reading through hand scribbled notes or cross comparing folders. You can also submit “on the go” from anyplace you have computer access. And since they’re already created and used by thousands of writers, you can start quickly with a pretty short learning curve.

Why then, you may ask, would I use NONE of those convenient digital goodies? Why for the love of haiku would I take the time to make my own laborious spreadsheet system?

No, I’m not totally bonkers. Because none of them have all the little idiosyncratic fields that I want. Sure most of them have fields to log whether the rejection was personal or whether a piece was shortlisted. But where do I note that the form rejection letter the publication used had SIX typos? (Salve to my ego- hah!) Where can I record that the editor is obsessed with hamster cosplay? (Future writing prompt?) Not to mention places for actual interactions with editors after acceptances. Was the contract problematic? Did the author copies arrive promptly? Do we both love sushi-flavored toothpaste? You know. Important stuff. You’ve got yours, I’ve got mine. So, yeah, I make my own. Don’t judge me. (grin)



Ye stars and little pixies! You’re right, I’ve been doing a LOT of talking. Feel like taking a turn? I’d love it if you jump into the comments and share your own favorite places to submit poetry. Feel free to tell us your thoughts and opinions on either part of our Submission Shuffle posts. Or let us know, gently, if we’ve got something wrong. (Gulp. Embarrassed foot shuffling.)

Then get out there and get subbing. As my mom said all the way through my high school years:  “Nobody can publish that poem until you let them read it.” And as usual, Mom knows best.

Bon chance to all of us! May our submission responses be filled with:


 See you all in print!


Wow! Thanks once again, Carrie, for all the wonderful tips, resources, leads, and encouragement. Now look out you hot mess of pending submissions future acceptances—here I come! 

Carrie L. Clickard is an internationally published author and poet, with books published by Simon & Schuster, Holiday House and Flashlight Press.  Look for her latest rhyming picture book from Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, Thomas Jefferson and the Mammoth Hunt: The True Story of the Quest for America's Biggest Bones, on January 1, 2019. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in numerous anthologies and periodicals as well, including Spider, Muse, Highlights, Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine, Havok, Myriad Lands, Clubhouse, Spellbound, Penumbra, Haiku of the Dead, and Underneath the Juniper Tree.

Browse through all of Carrie's posts on Today's Little Ditty HERE, or if you're specifically looking for her Rhyme Crime Investigation series, you'll find those posts collected HERE.


We're halfway through September already, and halfway through our DMC challenge to write what I'm calling a #QuestionPoem. Read Naomi Shihab Nye's Spotlight ON interview for more information about this month's challenge. Daily ditties featured this week were by Heidi Mordhorst, Sherry Howard, Brenda Davis Harsham, and Robyn Campbell. Read more poems (and post your own) on our September 2018 padlet.


Children's author and writing teacher Amy Ludwig VanDerwater is hosting this week's Poetry Friday roundup at The Poem Farm.





Thursday, September 13, 2018

DMC: "Questions, Questions" by Robyn Campbell




Questions, Questions

curious questions.
Can I really love so much
as the sky is big?
To eternity and back?
Around the world a million
times?
Can I touch with the same
sensation as a brand new babe?
A new wife?
Can I see love the same as two
mockingbirds?
Two doves?
A wife who has just lost her mate?
I will ask these things
for the rest of my days.
Are there really answers? I don't know.
I only see that I have truly loved and
truly lived and
truly tried to do my best.
Questions, questions beautiful questions.


© 2018 Robyn Campbell. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Wednesday, September 12, 2018

DMC: "September, When the Heat Finally Breaks and We Open the Windows" by Brenda Davis Harsham




September, When the Heat Finally Breaks 
and We Open the Windows

Rain pounds as sheer
curtains dance a damp minuet.
My husband’s shoulder
moves up and down,
under the tightly-gripped blanket
but the scent of rain
takes me back to camping
in a crowded tent, my children
fidgeting and sighing
around me as frogs croaked
and cicadas hummed, until
I thought I’d never hear my
own heart beat again.
The tent roof was green
and dark with seams from
front to back, moving with breezes.
My bedroom ceiling is cracked
from window to window, a dark
fine-lined pathway
with one dark spot. What is it?
A spider perhaps, frozen there,
wondering the same thing as me:


Why can’t I sleep?


© 2018 Brenda Davis Harsham. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Tuesday, September 11, 2018

DMC: "It's a Question of Imprint" by Sherry Howard




It's a Question of Imprint

What is my imprint today?

Soothe a hurt?
Trigger a smile?
Bestow a hug?
Create a treasure?

Will I do no harm?


© 2018 Sherry Howard. All rights reserved.




Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Monday, September 10, 2018

DMC: "Fear" by Heidi Mordhorst




Fear

I hear about the man, a prisoner, who, starved and beaten and surely afraid,
wrote the names of his fellows in human blood on scraps of cloth sewn
into the collar of a shirt—a shirt that would be worn by whichever of
the company of prisoners was first released, carried out into the
world on his own back.   Witness.   And I ask myself, sitting
here with my cup of tea in my flannel pajamas, comfort
abounding: how dare I fear any loss, any torrent of
grief that I work so hard to keep contained, writ
in the pulse of my overfed blood, sewn into
the muscle of my unmarked neck and
back, worn like a skin.    Listen.
Have I any right to fear?   
I must look at it,
live it, leave
it, let go,

turn
that skin
inside out.


© 2017 Heidi Mordhorst. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Thursday, September 6, 2018

Carrie Clickard: Doing the Submission Shuffle (Part One)




Who's ready to go back to school? 

Back to school isn't just for the kiddos, you know. Us writerly types need instruction and motivation too, so I've brought in my good friend, author and expert rear-kicker Carrie Clickard to do the job.

As a TLD contributor for the last four years, Carrie taught us the ins and outs of writing in rhyme with her Rhyme Crime Investigation series. She was also featured as a spotlight author and shared some jinxes, hexes, and curses just for fun. Now she feels we're ready to tackle the serious business of taking ourselves seriously as writers—by submitting our work.

When Carrie approached me with this topic, I thought it was a fabulous idea, but probably too much for just one post. As a result, she's gone above and beyond, offering a two-part series that's chock full of useful information and helpful resources. Today we begin with part one of Doing the Submission Shuffle.

Get out your planners and pencils, folks, class is in session!


Doing the Submission Shuffle (Part One)

I’m going to do it.  I’m going to use the dreaded “S” word.  In fact I’m going to use it all over this post. So gird your loins, poets. It’s time to set aside your quill pen and hand-crafted leather journal and get down and dirty with submissions, submissions, submissions.



If you’re like most writers, it’s a horrible thing, this idea of treating poetry as a business.  Hawking your lovingly crafted words from editor to editor makes you cringe.  You feel like one of those kids selling raffle tickets outside the grocery store where no one meets their eyes. What if they don’t like it? What if they say something horrible?  The very idea makes you want to



Agreed.  It’s a much more comfy world when we only share our gems with friends, crit buddies and knowledgeable, appreciative family. It’s not about the money anyway, it’s about expressing ourselves. Besides, who wants to spend time finding the right markets, and perfect the cover letter, and all that (shudder) noncreative time-sucking organization when we could be writing?  WE DO.  Because deep inside we want our art to be loved, almost as badly as we want to be loved.  We want every reader... er... editor to say:



Now if you truly don’t ever want to see your poetry between the covers of a magazine, anthology or book, you can stop reading right here.  We’ll wait while you collect your things.



Ok. Now, for the rest of us who crave that moment of OH-MY-GOD-THE-EDITOR-SAID-YES!!! My poem’s going to be PUBLISHED!! this post is for you.  We’re going to share some tools that will make choosing where to submit your poetry easier and hopefully more effective.  Let’s get to work.


Where do I start?

Whether you have a stockpile of poems looking for a good home or you’re willing to write specifically for open markets, the first thing you need to know is who is out there publishing what.  Then you can match your whats to their who-ses.  And if you are anything like me, plowing through hundreds of 2005 deadlines and defunct publications in Google or Yahoo search results can end up in



We all get to that space sometime during the submission journey, but let’s put it off as long as possible.  Thankfully, some clever online people have already done part of our work. We just have to pick out the tools that sound best and make them work for us.


Printed reference books & writing magazines

I’m going to assume most readers of this blog are pretty online savvy creatures. But if any of you out there crave real books you can mark up with highlighters, paperclip or dog-ear to your heart’s delight—don’t despair.  The Children’s Writers & Illustrators Market guide and The Poet’s Market are put out yearly in print and ebook format. Both are great sources of info, well organized, especially if you use the searchable ebook version. Poets & Writers Magazine is another great monthly source of publishing opportunities. It has a section for writing contests, grants and other publishing opportunities in every issue. (It’s online too, shhhhh!) You may be lucky and find copies of all three at your local library—if not, then your favorite bookstore.


Resources from writer groups

Many writer organizations and groups, like SCBWI, maintain printable and searchable lists of open markets—usually alphabetically and sometimes by genre. Some of these are reserved perks for members, some are publicly available. All of these can be great for general browsing and long term planning, but I find them a little less effective when I want to pinpoint specific subject or genre markets for those high gear all-my-subs-done-in-one-day sessions.


Submission aggregators online

Warning, click-addictive material ahead. If you’re not already using them, once you try out submission aggregating sites like Duotrope, The Submission Grinder, and Submittable’s new “Discover Opportunities,” you’ll find yourself surfing there all the time. They’ve done a lot of the legwork creating convenient databases of magazines, ezines, literary journals, anthologies and chapbook publishers you can search. 

All three of these sites give you a wide selection of poetry, fiction and non-fiction markets, the ability to search those markets based on genre/pay/fees/etc, and also tools to track your personal submissions onsite, should you choose to do so. Though there is a wide overlap, not all markets are listed with all three, so it can pay to visit all of them. Duotrope also has a newsletter you can subscribe to that delivers upcoming deadlines directly to your email.

To their credit and your potential addiction,  Duotrope and The Submission Grinder also let you see daily lists of recent responses from real life users, both acceptances and rejections. The Sub Grinder even gives you comparison charts for each market’s turnaround times—so you can obsess while you wait for email responses. Sure you’ll go there first with a stack of poems, seeking good matches to any open submission calls. But then you’ll find yourself clicking through just in case an anthology was posted that’s perfect for your yoga-goat sonnet. Or to find out if any adult reader publications actually pay for metered rhyme. (Rare as unicorns, but they do exist.)  Or to check if anybody else got a response from that #$!%# magazine that’s been thinking about your awesome villanelle for 10 months now.



None of the three is strong in tracking children’s poetry market responses currently. Most of the users are focused on subbing work for adults. So you don’t get the obsessive charts, but all the major kidlit players are listed, like the Highlights magazine family and Cricket Media’s mags. If you need kidlit magazine response times, try the market response listings on SCBWI’s Blueboard.

The major difference to most users at present is that Duotrope charges a $5 monthly or $50 annual fee—while the other two are free. Duotrope does give new registrants a one-time 7-day free trial, which should let you determine whether the fees are worthwhile for your particular needs.

There are lots of other online resources you can search (bloggers, forums, social media) and we’ll cover those next week in Part Two, along with some tips on how to track what you’ve sent where.

In the meantime, get out there and sub those poems!


Wait ... what? Not quite ready to shove your babies out in the harsh, cold light of professional poetry markets?  OK. My bad.

Here’s an alternative. Before we measure ourselves against the big scary markets, how about we try sharing our poetry with a friendly online group of fellow poets? Think of it as a dress-rehearsal.  There are several warm and welcoming groups out there you can submit to. You won’t be getting national kudos (or even paid) but you'll get valuable practice writing and sharing your poems in a safe space, and sometimes you'll get a little feedback or other incentive. You might even end up with a poem that you can submit to a poetry market later! But a word of caution: some markets do not accept work that has been previously published on blogs. Always read submission guidelines, TWICE.

Here are a few poetry sharing groups and forums we can personally recommend:

  • Poetry Friday—become a regular visitor to this weekly roundup of poetry offerings and you'll undoubtedly find invitations to share your own poems on a variety of blogs—especially during April (National Poetry Month), but throughout the year as well. You might even consider starting your own blog to share your work!

If we’ve missed one of your favorites, or you have something else to share, please chime in with a comment. Thanks for joining us today and stop back next week for part two of Doing the Submission Shuffle.

Oh, we'll be there, Carrie! 
I hope you'll join me in thanking Carrie for all the terrific information so far. Wait till you see what she has lined up for next week!


Carrie L. Clickard is an internationally published author and poet, with books published by Simon & Schuster, Holiday House and Flashlight Press.  Look for her latest rhyming picture book from Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, Thomas Jefferson and the Mammoth Hunt: The True Story of the Quest for America's Biggest Bones, on January 1, 2019. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in numerous anthologies and periodicals as well, including Spider, Muse, Highlights, Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine, Havok, Myriad Lands, Clubhouse, Spellbound, Penumbra, Haiku of the Dead, and Underneath the Juniper Tree.
If you missed last week's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye, her DMC challenge for September is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. We've gotten off to a great start, featuring daily ditties this week by Diane Mayr, Rebekah Hoeft, and Jessica Bigi. Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet.

This week's Poetry Friday roundup is being hosted by Carol Varsalona at Beyond LiteracyLink.  Her "Art of Summering" gallery is nearly ready for its unveiling!






DMC: "Me I Hope You Hear ME" by Jessica Bigi




Me I Hope You Hear ME

Were you listening at all?
love-love-love
somewhere amidst
all of the negative
words you heard

they seemed jumbled
with every emotion

I'm trying Mom
under rivers of tears
to be just how you
want me to be

because under all
of our differences
is a love that holds us together
even now in separate worlds

you in the sky and
me on earth
like the sun and moon
being so different
yet still helping each out
 

Me are you listening?
doubting your needs
against your family's

when they're trying in their way
while you're trying in yours
so jumbled in emotions
not hearing the love

dear Me listen to all things
that seem positive

like the sun and moon
with all their differences
love holds strong
with helping hands
 

Me listen please
I admit I don't
know all life's answers

Love Me from Me


© 2018 Jessica Bigi. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Wednesday, September 5, 2018

DMC: "To My Yesterself" by Rebekah Hoeft




To My Yesterself

Why, yesterself, did you waste any thought
or angst or time on things you couldn't change?
Why make your mind a cage? It sought,
dear yesterself, a waste of time and thought.
What shift, what happiness in you is wrought
by mere review? Let go or act! Exchange,
my yesterself, the weighty waste of thought
and angst for time spent on the things you change.


© 2018 Rebekah Hoeft. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books:






Tuesday, September 4, 2018

DMC: A cherita by Diane Mayr






in school I learned

spontaneous generation
is an erroneous theory

why then, each August,
do fruit flies appear to
tease awake my primal brain? 


© 2018 Diane Mayr. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Naomi Shihab Nye. Her DMC challenge is to write a letter to yourself in which you ask some questions that you don't have to answer. (Please keep in mind that your poem does not need to be in standard letter form.)

Post your poem on our September 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up presentation on Friday, September 28th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest collection of poetry from Greenwillow Books: