Tuesday, March 28, 2017

DMC: "Ode to a Conch" by Mindy Gars Dolandis




ODE TO A CONCH

Beautiful conch, Neptune’s blushing sunset charm,
perfumed by saline sand and seaweed. I lift your
cool, smooth alabaster to my ear and you
sing a whooshing symphony, a
melodious banquet that feeds my soul. 
What mysteries do you hold? The
history of eons. 


© 2017 Mindy Gars Dolandis. All rights reserved.


Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions: 
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration this Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:






Monday, March 27, 2017

DMC: "Ode to a Pink Dress" by Karen Eastlund




ODE TO A PINK DRESS

Sweet as cotton candy, you gathered me into a cloud 
     of pink confection
Where sheer and taffeta rustled lavishly
Each seam scented with anticipation
I slid my fingers around your slippery satin sash
My girlish twirls blossomed like peonies

You remember me after all these years?
Like silk stockings in a parade of bobby socks.


© 2017 Karen Eastlund. All rights reserved.


Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions:  
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration this Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:






Thursday, March 23, 2017

DMC: "Ode to an Object" by Heidi Mordhorst




It's taken some effort to keep up with the blog while I've been out of town this week. So for Poetry Friday, enjoy this extra little ditty from Helen Frost's ode poem challenge:


ODE TO AN OBJECT

I see you squatting solidly on the far side of the verb.
You wait patiently for action:  will it be bringing,
singing, ringing?  You might be licked, lifted, lit.
I may pronounce you struck, sipped or sifted.
   Oh—perhaps that is not patience,
   but resignation, even fear?  Object, do not fear.
There’s not much I can do without you.


© 2017 Heidi Mordhorst. All rights reserved.


Other featured poems this week were "Ode to Wind" by Linda Baie, "Ode to One Knitting Needle" by Laura Purdie Salas, "Ode to a Tissue" by Donna JT Smith, and "Ode to a Hyacinth Glass" by Diane Mayr. Only one week left to submit your poem in response to Helen Frost's challenge!
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration next Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:






Join Catherine Flynn for a wonder-filled Poetry Friday roundup at Reading to the Core.







DMC: "Ode to a Hyacinth Glass" by Diane Mayr




ODE TO A HYACINTH GLASS

Once crystalline now coated
with the grime of rotted sheaths
and root hairs shed, your new bulb's 
nascent roots tickle the water
silently absorbing all it needs
to flower. Jewel tones and heady
fragrance, winter consolation.

© 2017 Diane Mayr. All rights reserved.



Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions:  
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration on Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:





Wednesday, March 22, 2017

DMC: "Ode to a Tissue" by Donna JT Smith




ODE TO A TISSUE
                      (and an acrostic)


The faintest whiff of clean, starched sheets
In white, you lie flat, stiff, well pressed, waiting as
Shaking fingertips flounder, feeling for your straight, thin edge
Silently you caress my face, no, you are quietly humming
Unduly seasoned with salt from my tears.
Eternally crumpled, rolled up in a ball, do you have any regrets?
Shush, so happy to help.

© 2017 Donna JT Smith. All rights reserved.



Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions: 
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration on Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:





Tuesday, March 21, 2017

DMC: "Ode to One Knitting Needle" by Laura Purdie Salas




ODE TO ONE KNITTING NEEDLE

You taste sharp and tangy, some metal weapon,
but you dissolve to chimney smoke coziness
Your sleek, pearlescent point
tap dances with your twin,
turns your rhythm into fuzzy ribbons of warmth

Needle, why do you never rest?
Are you afraid to be alone?

© 2017 Laura Purdie Salas. All rights reserved.


Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions: 
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration on Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan:





Monday, March 20, 2017

DMC: "Ode to Wind" by Linda Baie





ODE TO WIND

I feel your power when fireplace ashes stir;
smoke puffed in stings my nose.
Window-tapping of the tree branches
accompanies dog growls and cat yowls.
I shiver-run for the news, taste snow in the wind.
Why not the breeze of yesterday?
Winter conceit.

© 2017 Linda Baie. All rights reserved.



Helen Frost has challenged us to write an ode poem this month, following these instructions: 
Choose an object (a seashell, a hairbrush, a bird nest, a rolling pin). It should not be anything symbolic (such as a doll, a wedding ring, or a flag). Write five lines about the object, using a different sense in each line (sight, sound, touch, taste, smell). Then ask the object a question, listen for its answer, and write the question, the answer, or both.
Click HERE to read her sample poem, "Ode to a River."

Post your poem on our March 2017 padlet. All contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration on Friday, March 31st, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her latest novel-in-poems from Farrar, Straus, and Giroux/Macmillan: