Thursday, October 26, 2017

DMC: "Night Monster" by Sydney O'Neill





NIGHT MONSTER

Burrow under blankets.
Block out light.
Curl to make me little.
Squeeze eyes tight.

Shush my booming heartbeat.
Breath comes hard.
Listen to the darkness.
Stay. On. Guard.

THUMP  Was that a footstep?
GROAN 
Too. Near. 
CLINK    He’s getting closer.
CLUNK 
He’s here!

MOM!  A MONSTER!  SAVE ME!
Quick, she flicks on light.
Whew! The monster’s gone.
Guess I gave him a fright.


© 2017 Sydney O'Neill. All rights reserved.


Click HERE to read this month's interview with Carrie Clickard. Her DMC challenge is to write a poem about a person, place, or thing that spooked you as a child.

Post your poem on our October 2017 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration tomorrow, Friday, October 27th, and one lucky participant will win a personalized copy of her enchanting new picture book from Holiday House:






12 comments:

  1. Such a fun poem, Sydney! I love the sound effects and the turnaround at the end.

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    1. Thank you, Michelle. And thanks to both you and Carrie Clickard for bringing us this fun challenge!

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  2. The rhythm seemed to quicken as it came closer, nicely done! Parents save save the day often!

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    1. Thanks, Linda! Yes, childhood could be much scarier if kids couldn't call for help. :-)

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  3. Love the rhymes, the rhythm, the use of punctuation and capitalization -- everything!

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  4. Really cute poem. I agree -- the rhythm and the rising tension. Very fun. Thanks.

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  5. LOL! That's hilarious...and so true to a child's reaction and perspective.

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    1. Thanks, Teresa! It's based on a true story. My childhood family had watched a monster movie. It's funny how long scary memories can last. :-)

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  6. My students will love this poem. They adore rhyme and rhythm and all things that go bump in the night with such frightening onomatopoeia.

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  7. I'm honored that you'll be reading it to them, Margaret. I wish I could be there to see their reactions!

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