Tuesday, February 20, 2018

DMC: "Epitaph for a Mayfly" by Matt Forrest Esenwine


Was born for flight (and reproduction),
set off for a swarm seduction.
Lost his mate; could not locate her.
Sadly, died a few hours later.

© 2018 Matt Forrest Esenwine. All rights reserved.

Click HERE to read this month's interview with J. Patrick Lewis and Jane Yolen. They have challenged us to write an epitaph poem—a funny or clever verse that might appear on your chosen subject's tombstone.

Post your poem on our February 2018 padlet. While some contributions will be featured as daily ditties this month, all contributions will be included in a wrap-up celebration this Friday, February 23rd, and one lucky participant will win a copy of their morbidly humorous collection from Charlesbridge:


  1. It's hard to find a quicker life, but glad to see you've thought of them, Matt. I like that 'swarm seduction'!

  2. Oh my. Talk about a lost opportunity! Thanks for the laugh, Matt. :D

  3. Such clever rhymes here! Well done, Matt.

  4. From Jane:

    Hey, womderful Matt--I have a small moral for your ditty!

    Life and death in one short day,
    But dying of love? The sweetest way.

  5. Poor Mayfly. Nicely done Matt. I love Jane's "moral."

  6. Fun, for everyone but the poor mayfly.

  7. Thank you all, so much. And Michelle, please tell Jane I said hi and thank you!

  8. Ugh. Mayfly season was the grossest thing about living near the lake on Detroit's east side. I want to feel bad for your little bug, but memories of trying not to touch one while getting into the car remain strong!

    1. We've never had an issue with them like that here in NH...we see them, but they don't do much and are gone quickly. The biggest insect issue we have in May here are black flies, which are like gnats that swarm around your head, get in your eyes and ears, and bite - usually from around early-mid May until the first week of June. You can't imagine how annoying they are!

  9. That's terrible--I've never been in NH during those months--happy to have missed them.