Thursday, January 15, 2015

Haiku Garden: Jone Rush MacCulloch


"Winter Strikes Back" by Bryce Mullet, Flickr Creative Commons

Jone Rush MacCulloch is no stranger to haiku.  For the last three years, she has participated in Shiki Kukai, a monthly haiku challenge that's now in its 19th year.  Each month, people from around the world write haiku based on two prompts– a Kigo, or seasonal word, and a free form word. The haiku are then anonymously distributed to the community for voting. Points are allotted by each member for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place entries, and the results are posted.  What a wonderful way to immerse yourself in the practice of writing this form!

Today I'm delighted to welcome Jone to the Haiku Garden. Given the difficult task of choosing amongst several of her beautiful and thought-provoking haiku, I decided upon this one, which was born from the February 2014 free form prompt: "longing."

For me, it was love at first sight...


                         between
                         snowfalls
                         the robin's song

                         © 2014 Jone Rush MacCulloch. All rights reserved.


"Winter Robin" by Bryce Mullet, Flickr Creative Commons


...and still I'm left longing for more.

Besides having the voice of a poet, Jone speaks with expertise as a library media specialist/teacher, and many sing her praises as Poetry Chair for the Cybils as well. (Find out more about the Children's and Young Adult Bloggers' Literary Awards HERE.) Did I mention that Jone also maintains three blogs? Her professional blog is called Check It Out: Life and Books in a K5 Library School Setting, her personal blog is Deo Writer, and Solace In Nature is her photography blog... oh yes, Jone is a talented photographer as well!

Thank you for taking a moment to share your talent
in the Haiku Garden, Jone.


In case you missed it, last week Joyce Sidman challenged us to write a "Deeper Wisdom" poem. You can find all the details HERE. So far I've featured poems from Katie Gast and Buffy Silverman, and today I must point you over to Reflections on the Teche, where Margaret Simon describes the deeper wisdom that she and her student poet, Matthew, achieved this week in the classroom.  I hope you'll consider sending me your poem. (Frankly, I can use all the wisdom I can get!)

You'll discover lots of wisdom in the poetry Irene Latham has selected to celebrate MLK Day. Those treasures and more can be found in today's Poetry Friday roundup at Live Your Poem.



42 comments:

  1. Love love love this robin between snowfalls! So beautiful. Thank you, Michelle and Jone. xo

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  2. Oh my, every bit of Jone's work is lovely. I just spotted a robin one morning this week!

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  3. I'm still waiting for my first robin of the year, so this is a nice reminder that I might not have to wait until spring - one can come with snow! Thanks Jone and Michelle.

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  4. This poem is particularly poignant.

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    1. Diane, thank you. it was a favorite from last year.

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  5. Love the robin's song between snowfalls -- beautiful!

    I'm familiar with Jone's blogs and have long admired her beautiful photography as well as haiku.

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  6. Okay, I love this poem, but I guess I'm somewhat dense. Is this haiku? I thought haiku was 5 syllables, 7 syllables, 5 syllables. Please let me know where I'm missing the boat here. Thanks!

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    1. No, Kristi, you're not dense! In school we are all taught the 5-7-5 format of haiku, but many modern writers of haiku do not believe that is how haiku was originally intended to be written. Here's an article that explains the reasoning pretty well: http://www.nahaiwrimo.com/home/why-no-5-7-5. Ultimately, what modern haiku poets are trying to achieve is the feeling of a moment in time which can be expressed in one breath. Personally, I "swing both ways" and have showcased both types of haiku here on TLD.

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    2. Thanks, Michelle. I just knew that you'd have a good explanation for me !

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    3. Kristi...this is an excellent resource: Writing and Enjoying Haiku: A Hands-on Guide Paperback
      by Jane Reichhold

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  7. Michelle, your choice of a poem and poet to highlight this week is inspiring. Jone's photography and words are an awesome combination. Congratulations to the two of you. My solitary bird perched on a branch that I noticed today was too quick for me to capture a photo. I was not expecting to see one in my backyard so I was caught off guard.

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    1. I wish it were my photography but it's not. I do have a twohee in the snow.

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  8. Isn't it amazing how they manage in the snow? They seem as though they would freeze, and yet...
    Lovely haiku, Jone!

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  9. Terrific, Jone! I can see and hear it in my imagination (but not out my window--too cold here for robins :( )

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  10. Especially wonderful interview of an intensely talented lady. Must find Winter Bees. And must enter this challenge.

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  11. Simple and elegant and full of longing--a lovely poem!

    Maria G

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  12. This is such a lovely haiku! It is simple and poignant, and captures a pure moment. Thanks for sharing!

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  13. Gorgeous haiku in just 5 words...wow! Thank you, Michelle for featuring Jone's poem.

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    1. I so love writing these and with so few words. Thanks.

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  14. Beautiful haiku. This just might tide me over until Spring.

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  15. Wow. That's amazing. Thanks for the link in your answer to Kristi (who asked the question I wanted to ask). Very informative.

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    1. Writing and Enjoying Haiku: A Hands-on Guide Paperback
      by Jane Reichhold A fabulous resource.

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  16. Gorgeous haiku, Jone. This poem suggests so many sensory details in just a few words.

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  17. Ooooooh, so much unsaid but still present! Haiku can hint, and the reader supplies the rest. Sometimes we supply different interpretations, but that is part of the magic of the form.

    As an aside, I don't think I've ever heard the term "swing both ways" refer to counting syllables. I snorted. ;-)

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  18. Beautiful and poignant - from such a multitalented, generous soul! Thanks to both of you for sharing.

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  19. Jone! Great to find you here! You are an inspiration.

    Kristi, thanks for asking about 5-7-5, and Michelle, thanks for pointing to a resource that has lots of other resources attached. I've been ready to get rid of 5-7-5, but was unsure how to do so and still be sure I was writing haiku. Now I've got a course of study...and maybe I'll try NaHaiWriMo!

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  20. Beautiful! So glad you shared Jone's haiku.

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  21. Lovely choice, Michelle. The poem and photos are perfect. Thanks so much for sharing!

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  22. Hi there Michelle. How lovely to see Jone featured here. I received one of her postcard poems several years back, from her students, and that was truly very sweet. :) Good to know about her other blogs.

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